Tag Archives: evidence based research

Study on Indoor Vaping: Unlikely to Pose a Risk

Indoor Vaping StudyAccording to the latest research, indoor vaping is unlikely to be a health threat to those within the vicinity. The ongoing debate regarding vaping indoors has recently been tested by a study that examines indoor air quality before and after usage, conducted by three educational research institutions from Europe, ETH Zurich the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

Kaunas University of Technology in Lithuania, and the EMPA Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology.

The findings have been remarkable, and they offer an exceptional range of data that has never before been available on the subject. The study was recently presented at a conference focused on research dedicated to indoor air quality in Barcelona Spain, and it is groundbreaking because this type of data was nonexistent prior.

The research specifically tested air quality risk to bystanders and non-vapors when exposed to vapor that has just been exhaled. The most groundbreaking aspect of the study found that the particulates of the e-liquid vapor dissipated in mere seconds after exhalation, which results in an extraordinarily low level of risk to those who are exposed to the vapor once it has been exhaled. Additionally this research throws a major monkey wrench into the argument of comparing e-cigarette vapor and tobacco smoke, likening the two as the same byproduct. For vapers, this is a major win because it adds evidence to the equation, where there was nothing more than educated speculation before.

Different scenarios were tested, involving rooms with and without ventilation systems, to see if the effect of the vapor’s dissipation was varying between them, however the researchers discovered the same results from both environments.

Tobacco smoke, is obviously the results of burnt plant matter, tobacco. It is laced with thousands of chemicals, and leaves behind a toxic tar. These particulates are extremely dangerous, and they accumulate over time once exhaled, lingering in the air. In contrast to vapor, in which the aerosol particles exist only for a few seconds afterwards, renders any such comparison between vapor and smoke, especially in regards to the secondhand affect, are completely void.

So, another positive study on the effects of vaping in the books. We are elated that such research is coming to light, and further adding to the credibility of this exciting, emerging industry!

CDC Study Shows Nonsmokers Are Not into Vapor

CDC Data on E-Cigarette UseYou are probably aware of the long-standing rumor among electronic cigarette critics that claims the popularity of e-cigarettes is promoting the products to the point of re-normalizing smoking, and will be luring in nonsmokers to become tobacco users. Yes, as farfetched as this is, it is an ongoing myth. However, to the benefit of those who are aware of how e-cigarettes are actually used, and to clarify the situation to all the misguided anti-e-cig folks out there, the CDC recently published a study, done by the National Health Interview Study, providing statistics on the electronic cigarette usage habits of smokers and nonsmokers. Suffice it to say, the evidence has completely buried the argument of e-cigarettes being a threat to the nonsmoking community, as well as shedding light on how smokers are using electronic cigarettes.

This study offers the most conclusive evidence, with hard statistics on the habits of smokers, recently quit nonsmokers, and ex-cigarette smokers, and we applaud the CDC for taking such a progressively common sense stance on the matter.

Stats of Note:

  • 12.6% of American adults have tried an e-cigarette at least once
  • 3.7% of American adults use e-cigarette devices regularly, minimally some days.
  • 47% of smokers & 55% of recently-quit former smokers have tried a vapor device at least once
  • 15.9% of smokers & 22% of recently-quit former smokers use e-cigarettes somewhat regularly
  • Less than 0.4% of electronic cigarette users were nonsmokers prior to trying them

*Also noteworthy: the study also found that tobacco users who currently smoke cigarette who had also attempted to quit smoking in the past year were more likely to  use vapor devices in their strategy to quit smoking.

Considering these are statistics taken from a legitimate study, the findings are pretty interesting, right? While there is the slightest hairline of a fraction of a percentage of nonsmokers who have actually been turned on to vaping, this figure is extremely small, and certainly not notable enough to convince anyone that electronic cigarettes are a threat to the non smoking community. The bottom line here is that the vast majority of those using e-cigarettes are doing so to avoid tobacco, and nonsmokers are absolutely not in danger of becoming the next big smoking demographic as a result of vapor products; we are quite pleased the CDC is recognizing this data.  

E-Cigarettes and Evidence-Based Research

Evidence Based E-Cigarette ResearchOne of the things we are happy this industry is seeing a lot of these days is evidence-based research. It can be confounding that studies such as the unfairly biased, seriously erroneous item published in the New England Journal of Medicine could have been released so inconclusively by a major and reputable publication, however to the benefit of the industry, and everyone involved, there is plenty of other research emerging, from trusted sources, with all the facts included.

It can be very frustrating to a movement such as the e-cigarette industry, when misconstrued reports, half-truths, and twisted facts are published as truth. We want the truth, as do the millions of people who use these products, as well as the millions of other smokers who are interested yet waiting for more research and evidence.

Luckily, there have been several excellent recent studies that dispel many of the common myths of electronic cigarettes, while debunking some of the fraudulent truth-bending, and helping to promote the need for more evidence-based research.

One of the best examples of such is a 2014 study that included 1300 college students in America. Its purpose was to examine the myth of electronic cigarettes being touted as a gateway to smoking. It’s findings? That e-cigarettes do not lead to traditional cigarette usage.

Another great example is a study published by Oxford Journal, that examined exactly what could be found in secondhand vapor. The study was conducted by 6 doctors performing a variety of different tests to obtain their data. The results concluded that some nicotine was present (in trace amounts, precisely), however there were no combustible toxins.

In addition, there have been many other studies published, as well as those in the works, aiming to make clear how electronic cigarettes affect the body, especially in regard to the heart and lungs. One recent study done by The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found that vaping does not affect the heart. Another study done by researchers in Greece found that e-cigarettes did not negatively affect the lungs either.

So what this means for the e-cigarette industry, is that while these studies may be coming slowly, and research may be in its infancy, evidence is emerging in favor of e-cigarettes and proving the negative speculation wrong.